Gregory Stapp

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Representative Review Extracts

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Osmin
Figaro
Sarastro
Falstaff
Don Quixote
Kecal
Pluto
Emperor Altoum
Nilakantha
Raimondo
Bluebeard
Fasolt
Reverend Hale
Achillas
Don Basilio
Charlemagne
Ramfis
Friar Lawrence
Dansker
Grand Inquisitor
Timur
Colline
Ashby
Brander
Don Fernando
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Osmin in The Abduction from the Seraglio

Top honors for pleasing the crowd as well as vocalism went to Gregory Stapp as Osmin, …Stapp has the vocal wherewithal to execute this demanding role--both its tongue-twisting fury and its extremes of range--and did it all with an enchanting comic flair. — Joshua Kosman, San Francisco Chronicle 1989

The leading light was gifted young bass Gregory Stapp as Pasha Selim’s comic overseer Osmin, his voice and musical grasp right as could be. — Robert Commanday, San Francisco Chronicle 1991

Stapp’s spectacular performance as Osmin was the hit of the evening. A natural basso with the enormous range Mozart demands, he is also a fine comic actor and very agile for a tall man. His singing was superb. — Asbury Park Press

Bass Gregory Stapp came close to stealing the show as Osmin…Stapp’s six-foot-six-inch figure dominated the stage, as did his big voice, which is a true bass--a welcome change from the bass-baritones we hear so often these days passing as basses. Stapp showed himself capable of descending to the low D the role calls for, and it was a pleasure to hear him handle his low-lying music with ease and richness of tone. His singing of Osmin’s familiar aria in the final act stopped the show. — Trenton Times

Stapp as Osmin, portrayed a role with seemingly few, if any, likeable qualities, yet one which was a big success with the audience, thanks to his good comedic timing and phenomenal Russian bass voice. — Princeton Town Topics

Abduction from the Seraglio featured one singer who commanded the audience’s full attention, vocally and dramatically, every moment he was onstage. Basso Gregory Stapp…had what it took to carry off the role’s vocal challenges. Too often, the role is portrayed with either vocal or dramatic strengths--what a pleasure to have one person with the necessary combination. — New Brunswick Home News

Stapp was a sensational Osmin. A tall, muscled fellow, he…had a resounding, luminous bass voice to match. Whether he spoke or sang, the sound was wonderful. Quite simply, he stole the show. — Hayward Daily Review

The comic rogue role of Osmin--the most human of all those on stage--demands much both vocally (he frequently goes below the bass clef) and in acting. Gregory Stapp aced both aspects. — Birmingham News

And talk about imposing: Gregory Stapp’s Osmin towers over everyone on the stage. His deep, resonant voice is just as looming. — Princeton Packet

Whenever Osmin took to the stage he tended to dominate it, with expertise and presence, along with a wonderfully resonant voice [and] array of colorful antics and enthusiastic characterization. — San Luis Obispo Telegram-Tribune

All the singers performed marvelously.… Stapp displayed a remarkable voice. — Birmingham Post-Herald

No single singer stole the show [but] Gregory Stapp as Osmin, came close. His large, deep basso and his six-foot-eight stage presence held the attention when he was present. Despite his height he was nimble of foot and tumbled into a waiting wheelbarrow gracefully. — Newark Star-Ledger

Stapp, whose powerful, finely focussed bass makes him a superb Osmin, proved to be a fine comic also.…The bass was especially fine in his battle of wits with Blonde at the beginning of Act II, in the merry duet with Pedrillo who gets him drunk and when, after capturing the lovers, he sings that at last he is going to settle old scores with Pedrillo and Belmonte. Never has one operatic character gloated so convincingly over the misfortunes of others and Stapp managed to touch a top E and a bottom D in his highly satisfactory efforts. — Five Cities Times-Press-Recorder

A tall, lanky and expressive bass, Stapp’s standout performance captures all the musical & dramatic charms of this melodramatic villain. — Contra-Costa Times

Among the many highlights would be Stapp’s singing of Osmin’s entrance aria and his triumphant O wie will ich triumphieren near the end. — Indianapolis News

…rendered superfluous the supertitles…giant stature and roomy bass voice… — Indianapolis Star

Gregory Stapp did some fine singing with impressive bass notes issuing from his formidable form [and] he adduced some nicely earned chuckles… — Tri-State Defender

…an able comedian as the cantankerous harem overseer, Osmin, Gregory Stapp sang with a rich bass… — Memphis Commercial Appeal

All the singers were fine Mozartean singers and actors who could handle the comedy, much of it broad and rather good-natured, without going over the top…Bass Gregory Stapp was a tall, powerful Osmin, who handled the comic turns with wit and a flexible bass voice, which could handle Mozart’s classy comic music with an agile smile in his voice. — Albany Times Union

The comic scene stealer, though was Stapp, a bass with a cavernous voice and an awesome physical presence. This huge mountain of a man has the strength to pick up others in the cast without even straining. He was perfect in this role of one of opera’s most likable villains, and he totally dominated the first act. — Schenectady Daily Gazette

Gregory Stapp has droll moments as the oafish overseer, Osmin, and his basso is sonorous on the low end… — Cleveland Plain Dealer

Superior voices: Carter as the heroine and Stapp as the imperious Osmin…Stapp was simply wonderful, his size very much in synch with his role as gate-keeper. — He was vocally and dramatically terrific. As a matter of fact, I think he abducted the show…The comic interaction between Osmin and Blondchen, as well as between Osmin and Pedrillo, was exquisitely funny. — Vox/inCamera

Osmin, more than six feet tall and turbaned, is roundly sung by Gregory Stapp, who punctuates his deep bass notes with hugely comic physical turns… — Saratoga Springs Saratogian

All the singers were in exceptional voice…Bass Gregory Stapp as the overseer Osmin was sometimes overwhelming with his large frame and big voice. But they were an effective addition to his role. He also looked magnificent in his wine and gold robes. — Glens Falls Post

Abduction from the Seraglio …boasts a score by the master. Three things going for this opera were Mozart, excellent soprano Elizabeth Carter, who tackled a challenging part with great vocal beauty, and Gregory Stapp, the giant — giant! — bass who stole this show. — Glens Falls Chronicle

Osmin
Figaro
Sarastro
Falstaff
Don Quixote
Kecal
Pluto
Emperor Altoum
Nilakantha
Raimondo
Bluebeard
Fasolt
Reverend Hale
Achillas
Don Basilio
Charlemagne
Ramfis
Friar Lawrence
Dansker
Grand Inquisitor
Timur
Colline
Ashby
Brander
Don Fernando
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Figaro in The Marriage of Figaro

Gregory Stapp’s Figaro is everything one could hope for…He has a commanding presence, a keen sense of satire, and a fabulously rich voice that flows with ease across the range of Mozart’s demands…his voice was seamless, supple and in absolute control. — Reno Gazette-Journal

Sarastro in The Magic Flute

All 18 solo roles were vocally admirable, which is quite a feat. Worth special note…Gregory Stapp’s Jupiter-like performance of Sarastro… — San Francisco Chronicle

Stapp, a tall authoritative Sarastro, sang with easy legato. — Opera News

Sarastro is a basso profundo in the true meaning of the word. The possessor of a rather unique voice, bold with its stentorian quality and excellent diction, Stapp was an excellent choice as the High Priest. — Eugene Register-Guard

The nobility and dignity of Stapp’s on-stage presence was matched by his singing of In diesen heil’gen Hallen.Indianapolis News

Gregory Stapp is a golden-voiced Sarastro. — Reno Gazette-Journal

…their voices are just about all one could wish for…Bass Gregory Stapp was picture perfect as the all-wise high priest Sarastro. His stage presence was dignified, radiating calm strength and rectitude. — Carmel Pine Cone

…the vocally handsome bass Gregory Stapp. — Oakland Tribune

…talented cast performed admirably…Gregory Stapp’s impressive Sarastro… — Oakland Post

The solo and ensemble singing were of an even and high level…Gregory Stapp made an imposing Sarastro, [displaying] all the tonal attractions of his bass. — San Francisco Chronicle

…consistently excellent singers…Gregory Stapp was an imposing Sarastro with an imposing voice, particularly in O Isis und Osiris. Monterey Herald

The solid level of singers numbers among the strengths of City Opera; this time as well the thoroughly good cast without weak points, all reliable singers of distinction, contributed decisively to the success…Gregory Stapp, a Sarastro of vocal stature… — Opernwelt

Osmin
Figaro
Sarastro
Falstaff
Don Quixote
Kecal
Pluto
Emperor Altoum
Nilakantha
Raimondo
Bluebeard
Fasolt
Reverend Hale
Achillas
Don Basilio
Charlemagne
Ramfis
Friar Lawrence
Dansker
Grand Inquisitor
Timur
Colline
Ashby
Brander
Don Fernando
Concert & Miscellaneous
Top of Reviews
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Falstaff in The Merry Wives of Windsor

Vocally, he was outstanding, the resonant warmth of his fine bass shining through. — San Francisco Chronicle

Stapp was almost too appealing as the fat but audaciously amorous Falstaff. He sang with a richly resonant voice and skillfully affected the movements of a grossly overweight, bumbling knight. The tavern scene, where Falstaff held forth with a speaking voice as syrupy rich as his singing, was fast-moving fun. — Hayward Daily Review

…a rich-voiced Falstaff…has a clear bass…led off the second act with a rousing version of the basso drinking song.Oakland Tribune

The quality of Stapp’s singing and acting as Falstaff was very high…his diction was exceptionally clear…was as much fun to watch as he was to hear…his drinking scene in the tavern was a gem. — Oakland Montclarion

Don Quixote in Man of La Mancha

Everything about Stapp’s (Don Quixote) performance worked: his command of the stage, his tall, straight body, the way he used it, and his vocal inflections… His full-bodied and very deep bass tones resonated throughout the auditorium, matching the dynamism of his role. — The Oak Ridger

Bass, Gregory Stapp plays the part of Don Quixote; rather he sings the part and he does an excellent job of it. Stapp is an experienced performer and that shows from the first scene to the last. — Monroe Advocate / Democrat

A fine cast led by Stapp as Don Quixote, delivered a performance that brought the audience to its feet at the finale for a standing ovation.… Stapp’s sonorous bass carried the majority of the musical load… — Knoxville News-Sentinel

Kecal in The Bartered Bride

Gregory Stapp is great as Kecal — not a villain as much as a cynical realist…he dominates much of the dramatic action with his visual presence. — Honolulu Magazine

Bass Gregory Stapp as Kecal, the marriage broker, cuts an imposing physical and dramatic figure. Stapp captured the spirit of the role very well, turning Kecal into an avaricious but generally likeable dirt bag. — Honolulu Star-Bulletin & Advertiser

Pluto in Monteverdi’s Il ballo dell’ingrate

Stapp, resplendent in the fanciest of the baroque costumes, was a grand bass for Pluto. — San Francisco Chronicle

Bass Gregory Stapp had a wide range and vocal depth as Pluto. — Peninsula Times Tribune

Bass Gregory Stapp’s Pluto was sonorous. — San Francisco Examiner

Stapp is a tremendous sight as Pluto…shows that he has the low notes of a real bass.— Sacramento Bee

Osmin
Figaro
Sarastro
Falstaff
Don Quixote
Kecal
Pluto
Emperor Altoum
Nilakantha
Raimondo
Bluebeard
Fasolt
Reverend Hale
Achillas
Don Basilio
Charlemagne
Ramfis
Friar Lawrence
Dansker
Grand Inquisitor
Timur
Colline
Ashby
Brander
Don Fernando
Concert & Miscellaneous
Top of Reviews
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Emperor Altoum in Busoni’s Turandot

…Stapp sang the role of Altoum with intelligence and musicality… — New York Times

The Emperor, who in this version has a wonderful part,…was sung marvelously by Gregory Stapp. He is marvelous! — Darien News-Review

This first-ever American staging featured strong singing…Gregory Stapp provided an imposing old Emperor Altoum. — Opera News

The production also had the benefit of a superior cast…Gregory Stapp endowed the aged Chinese Emperor, Altoum, with imperial dignity and concern at his offspring’s reign of death. — Bridgeport Post-Telegram

Anyone recalling Gregory Stapp in the company’s Edinburgh appearances [Mr. Kofner in The Consul ] can readily picture his affecting Altoum. — Opera Magazine

Stapp as the Emperor Altoum, made [a] strong musical impression. — Bergen Record

The opera is well cast vocally…filled with strong singers, including Gregory Stapp as the Emperor,… — Stamford Advocate

The rest of the cast was equally fine. Bass Gregory Stapp’s Altoum sang with sensitivity. — Greenwich News 

Nilakantha in Lakmé

Bass Gregory Stapp was a commanding Nilakantha [who] sang with deep resonance and lyrical tone…the diction was bright and clear among all the principals… — New Orleans Times-Picayune

Charlemagne in Schubert’s Fierrabras

Gregory Stapp’s bass-baritone was worthy of Charlemagne. — Opera News

The one singer who remained imbedded on one’s memory even when offstage was Gregory Stapp as Charlemagne. The darkest voice in the work, the role served as its dramatic pivot. Were Mr. Stapp a shade older, the title figure, poor Fierrabras, would have been largely eclipsed. — The Georgetowner

…a worthy Charlemagne… — Philadelphia Inquirer

It is easy to visualize Mr. Stapp [Charlemagne] as King Marke in ten years or so. — 1980, Harold C. Schonberg, New York Times

Osmin
Figaro
Sarastro
Falstaff
Don Quixote
Kecal
Pluto
Emperor Altoum
Nilakantha
Raimondo
Bluebeard
Fasolt
Reverend Hale
Achillas
Don Basilio
Charlemagne
Ramfis
Friar Lawrence
Dansker
Grand Inquisitor
Timur
Colline
Ashby
Brander
Don Fernando
Concert & Miscellaneous
Top of Reviews
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Raimondo in Lucia di Lammermoor

…produced a huge, sympathetic sound as Raimondo… — Opera News

Stapp as Raimondo elicited cheers for his deep, ringing bass. — Arizona Republic

Bass Gregory Stapp, who sang the role of Lucia’s ally, Raimondo, dominated the stage both through his height and his powerful voice. — Arizona Daily Star

Stapp (Raimondo), who twice before sang with the company, again showed himself to be a most competent bass and a superior actor. — Sacramento Bee

Bluebeard in Bartok’s Duke Bluebeard’s Castle

Bass Gregory Stapp sang the title role (Duke Bluebeard’s Castle) of the mystical and probably psychopathic recluse with an appropriate detachment.. — San Jose Mercury News

Bass Gregory Stapp conveyed much of Bluebeard’s melancholy menace… — San Francisco Chronicle

Don Basilio in Rossini’s The Barber of Seville

…Gregory Stapp’s forceful bass rumble, and some tricks with a few handkerchieves, made Don Basilio’s description of how slander will win Rosina’s hand for Bartolo, La Calunnia, a delight. — Tulsa World

Fasolt in Das Rheingold

…another royal bass-baritone, as Fasolt, was a joy to hear and watch… — San Jose Mercury News

…the cast performed to international standards…Gregory Stapp as Fasolt commanded attention with [a] powerful interpretation.Portland Oregonian

Fasolt’s (Gregory Stapp) ardent love for Freia was a poignant focal point. — Opernwelt

Stapp’s Fasolt was unusually effective. — Seattle Post-Intelligencer

Seattle has conclusively proved that all the complaints about today’s lack of voices suitable to Wagner are simply uninformed…Seattle had no trouble finding unfamous singers who could fill a 3,000-seat house in the great heroic roles. Gregory Stapp was an imposing giant… — Boston Globe

…the giant figure of Gregory Stapp as Fasolt with a rolling voice to match. — International Herald-Tribune

Reverend Hale in Ward’s The Crucible

Gregory Stapp, with his towering height and stately bass voice, was an imposing Reverend Hale. — Tulsa World

Osmin
Figaro
Sarastro
Falstaff
Don Quixote
Kecal
Pluto
Emperor Altoum
Nilakantha
Raimondo
Bluebeard
Fasolt
Reverend Hale
Achillas
Don Basilio
Charlemagne
Ramfis
Friar Lawrence
Dansker
Grand Inquisitor
Timur
Colline
Ashby
Brander
Don Fernando
Concert & Miscellaneous
Top of Reviews
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Achillas in Julius Caesar

Gregory Stapp sang in an exhilarating fashion as Achillas, demonstrating a fine control of tone and phrasing, particularly in his dying aria. — Oakland Tribune

Stapp, whose every English word could be understood, was well heard as Achillas, Ptolemy’s general. — San Diego Union

…all respond handsomely to their responsibilities, with Stapp especially distinguishing himself as Ptolemy’s general. — San Francisco Examiner

Stapp made an imposing Achillas. — Los Angeles Herald Examiner

Special credit must go to Gregory Stapp as Achillas, who was the only singer whose every word was understandable. — Sacramento Union

Stapp bathed the rolling platitudes of Achillas in warm, long-winded, basso tone. — Martin Bernheimer, Los Angeles Times

Friar Lawrence in Roméo et Juliette

There was admirable and incisive singing from Gregory Stapp as Friar Lawrence. Stapp has a real bass voice…his work in this production is one of its major strengths. — Sacramento Bee

…bouquets for Gregory Stapp’s sonorous Friar Lawrence… — Opera

Gregory Stapp displayed a rich, full bass voice as the sympathetic Friar Lawrence. — San Francisco Bay City News Service

Friar Lawrence has the most genuine music in the entire opera’s bag of tunes and Gregory Stapp was affective in the role. — San Francisco Chronicle

The Friar Lawrence of Gregory Stapp is visually very impressive and vocally resonant. — Sacramento Union

Gregory Stapp, as Friar Lawrence gave [an] admirable performance. — Jackson Daily News

Dansker in Britten’s Billy Budd

Gregory Stapp’s Dansker, John Duyker’s Red Whiskers, Harold Gray Meers’ Novice and Scott Scully’s Squeak made fine contributions. — Opera News

Gregory Stapp’s Dansker was a likeable old salt;…his round bass voice and palpable sincerity gave him a powerful presence. — Andante.com Magazine

Gregory Stapp (Dansker) contributed mightily. — Opera West

The large cast was excellent:…Gregory Stapp (Billy’s pal, old Dansker),… — San Francisco Classical Voice

Particularly appealing were…Gregory Stapp’s compassionate Dansker. — Bay Area Reporter

The singing by the versatile performers was commendable, with the Iago-like persona of Ens dominant, supported by stalwarts like Dansker (Gregory Stapp),… — Arts San Francisco

There were fine performances in supporting roles by Gregory Stapp (Dansker),… — Contra Costa Times

Standouts among the large cast were bass Gregory Stapp as the friendly but realistic Dansker,… — San Francisco Chronicle

Among the denizens of HMS Indomitable, Gregory Stapp’s Dansker, John Duyker’s Red Whiskers and Harold Meer’s novice commanded attention. — Opera

memorable solo performances by Gregory Stapp as the wise old seaman,… — Fairfield Daily Republic

Osmin
Figaro
Sarastro
Falstaff
Don Quixote
Kecal
Pluto
Emperor Altoum
Nilakantha
Raimondo
Bluebeard
Fasolt
Reverend Hale
Achillas
Don Basilio
Charlemagne
Ramfis
Friar Lawrence
Dansker
Grand Inquisitor
Timur
Colline
Ashby
Brander
Don Fernando
Concert & Miscellaneous
Top of Reviews
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Sparafucile in Rigoletto

Sparafucile was particularly well cast. Stapp has the right tall, lean menacing looks for the hired murderer (with his own peculiar ethics) and the satisfyingly deep, low tones in his dark, bass voice. — Sarasota Herald Tribune

[Rigoletto’s] duet with Gregory Stapp, a giant Sparafucile, was memorable. Stapp possesses a large bass voice with a few appropriately rough edges. He dominated the last scene easily and made the killing of Gilda seem very much a premeditated event. — Opera News Online

The murderous brother-sister pair of Sparafucile and Maddalena had excellent champions in Gregory Stapp and Kate Aldrich…grandly sonorous, just right for Sparafucile. — Clevland Plain Dealer

Stapp, as the slimy assassin Sparafucile, sang wonderfully well. Nevertheless, the ultimate success of his performance lay more in his acting ability than in the actual singing. — Ann Arbor News

Stapp, who sang the part of Sparafucile, the assassin, epitomized the dark side of human nature. His voice had power, resonance and control. — Suttertown News

Gregory Stapp sang a powerful Sparafucile. — Newark Star-Ledger

Gregory Stapp was a vocally and physically imposing Sparafucile. — Baltimore Sun

Ramfis in Aïda

…the Ramfis of Gregory Stapp, whose bass was richly foreboding… — Opera News

Gregory Stapp sang Ramfis with a commanding and resonant bass. — Denver Post

Gregory Stapp has a fine voice as the vindictive priest Ramfis… — Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph

Bass Gregory Stapp (Ramfis, the High Priest) possesses a sonorous but bright voice and established his character with great presence. — Knoxville News-Sentinel

A grand bass sound was prevalent throughout the opera…Gregory Stapp (Ramfis) intoned endless litanies with solemn beauty and impressive technique. — The Oakridger

Gregory Stapp, a fearsome Fasolt in Seattle Opera’s Ring, sings a noble Ramfis. — Boulder Daily Camera

The Grand Inquisitor in Don Carlo

In the pivotal and vindictive role of Grand Inquisitor is basso Gregory Stapp’s monument to ecclesiastical corruption and bigotry. Stapp’s superb vocalism, insistent phrasing and menacing presence lent needed vitality and saved the day in his long duologue with the king. — Reno Gazette-Journal

Stapp has the deep bass notes and the physique for an imposing Grand Inquisitor. — Portland Itemizer Observer

Other dark-voiced contributions of quality came from Stapp’s Inquisitor… — New Orleans Times-Picayune

Osmin
Figaro
Sarastro
Falstaff
Don Quixote
Kecal
Pluto
Emperor Altoum
Nilakantha
Raimondo
Bluebeard
Fasolt
Reverend Hale
Achillas
Don Basilio
Charlemagne
Ramfis
Friar Lawrence
Dansker
Grand Inquisitor
Timur
Colline
Ashby
Brander
Don Fernando
Concert & Miscellaneous
Top of Reviews
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Nourabad in Les Pêcheurs des Perles

Bass Gregory Stapp made an admirable Nourabad. — Opera News

Gregory Stapp, a very handsome bass, managed to dominate his scenes in spite of a costume more out of Assyrian music hall than grand opera. — Portland Itemizer-Observer

American bass Gregory Stapp gave a fine performance as Nourabad, the high priest. — Portland Our Times

Gregory Stapp was a dramatically effective Nourabad. — Opera Canada

The Parson in Janacek’s The Cunning Little Vixen

Among the standouts in an almost uniformly fine cast…bass Gregory Stapp [Parson] and tenor Anthony Laciura [Schoolmaster] as the Forester’s drinking companions. — San Francisco Chronicle

Bass Gregory Stapp’s Parson…made fine contributions. — Contra-Costa Times

…bass Gregory Stapp, a resonant but embittered parson…Opera Japonica

Timur in Turandot

As Timur, bass Gregory Stapp presented a notable portrayal of ruined majesty. — Denver Post

Timur was sympathetically interpreted by bass Gregory Stapp, who caused Timur to become so pathetic and so vulnerable in his blindness that you wanted to go right up on stage and take him home to safety. — Colorado Springs Cheyenne Edition

Gregory Stapp proved a fine resonant bass as the dethroned King Timur… — Buffalo News

Timur was well sung by Gregory Stapp… — Opera

Gregory Stapp as a dignified and tragic Timur… — Boulder Daily Camera

Gregory Stapp plays Timur, Calaf’s blind father, with dignity… — Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph

The Priest in Shostakovitch’s Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk

…acted and sang flawlessly… Opera News

Nicely etched cameos are contributed by Gregory Stapp as a boozy-basso priest,… — Los Angeles Times

Stapp is an imposing Priest. — Sacramento Union

Stapp was very impressive as the Priest. — Oakland Tribune

…a splendid performance by Gregory Stapp as the superstitious Priest. — Fine Arts News Service

Osmin
Figaro
Sarastro
Falstaff
Don Quixote
Kecal
Pluto
Emperor Altoum
Nilakantha
Raimondo
Bluebeard
Fasolt
Reverend Hale
Achillas
Don Basilio
Charlemagne
Ramfis
Friar Lawrence
Dansker
Grand Inquisitor
Timur
Colline
Ashby
Brander
Don Fernando
Concert & Miscellaneous
Top of Reviews
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The Commendatore in Don Giovanni

…awesome Commendatore… — Opera

Bass Gregory Stapp was the vocal anchor for the ensemble, his avenging Commendatore deeply sonorous, and full of doom for the Don. — Napa Valley Register

Stapp fought a commendable duel and sang sonorously as the Commendatore alive, dying and dead. — Albany Times Union

The Opera Theatre of St. Louis’ finest musical achievements could be heard in a Don Giovanni production that was brimming with fine vocal talent…Gregory Stapp’s awesomely sung Commendatore… — Houston Post

The Commendatore’s ghost voice was very well produced by Gregory Stapp. — St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Stapp didn’t get to sing much as the Commendatore. It’s a great pity, too. He would make a fine Méphistophélès in Faust. — Stockton Record

Gregory Stapp was the vocal anchor for the ensemble as the avenging Commendatore, his tones deeply sepulchral and resounding with doom for the Don. — San Francisco Classical Voice

The relatively small part of the Commendatore got a lift from the velvety voice of Gregory Stapp, who deserves bigger and better parts. — Monterey Peninsula Herald

Gregory Stapp was a magnificent Commendatore when alive and a chilling one later. — Portland Itemizer-Observer

Colline in La Bohème

Gregory Stapp was stalwart vocally and physically as the philosopher, Colline. His rendition of the Overcoat aria was commendable for its subtleness. — Bridgeport Post

Stapp does admirable work…sings so well he makes one wish his role was bigger. — Sacramento Bee

Stapp, as philosopher Colline, acted well and the bass’ vocals were smooth. — Jackson Clarion Ledger

…thoroughly impressive performance by bass Gregory Stapp as Colline…— Sacramento Union

Ashby in La fanciulla del west

Stapp made a magnificent Ashby. — Opera News

Stapp was impeccable and commandingly tall (a would-be Wotan of the High Sierras). — Opera

Stapp [Ashby] stood out, cinematically robust, with enviable low notes. — Rome La Stampa

Lesser parts were often outstanding, particularly Gregory Stapp’s Wells Fargo agent… — Washington Post

…the only singer with any command was Gregory Stapp as Ashby. — Rome International Courier

Brander in Berlioz’s The Damnation of Faust

Gregory Stapp made a solid success of his tavern scene comic song, the coarse The Rat In The Cellar. The American bass has appeared in more than 20 SFO productions and added a solid musical moment to this Damnation. — Seattle Gay News

In the Tavern scene, Gregory Stapp sang the Brander’s Song of the Rat in broad style, suggesting a very large rodent indeed. — San Francisco Classical Voice

Gregory Stapp was a commanding Brander. — Contra Costa Times

For the Flea Song in Auerbach’s cellar, Sigmundsson had the grotesquerie of his role down brilliantly (and he had a wonderful counterpart in Gregory Stapp’s deliciously repulsive Brander)… — Andante.com Magazine

Don Fernando in Fidelio

Gregory Stapp (Don Fernando) handles his brief appearance in the final scene with aplomb. — Opera

Gregory Stapp rode handsomely to the rescue as Don Fernando who rights all political wrongs. — New Orleans Times-Picayune

Osmin
Figaro
Sarastro
Falstaff
Don Quixote
Kecal
Pluto
Emperor Altoum
Nilakantha
Raimondo
Bluebeard
Fasolt
Reverend Hale
Achillas
Don Basilio
Charlemagne
Ramfis
Friar Lawrence
Dansker
Grand Inquisitor
Timur
Colline
Ashby
Brander
Don Fernando
Concert & Miscellaneous
Top of Reviews
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Concert, Recital & Miscellaneous

As the talented and amiable guest artist, the symphony was fortunate to have Gregory Stapp…Tall, ruggedly handsome and ingratiatingly unassuming, he might have been a hit for his presence alone. But coupled with it is his fresh and deeply melodious bass voice. Stapp presented a wide representation of his talents, opening with Il lacerato spirito and immediately switching to a lighter comic mood for La calunnia…he returned to intone an impressive Ave Signor from Mefistofele, doubtless the type of role he is destined for…Also showcasing his superior bass was the gentler In diesen heil’gen Hallen & a warmly intense Some Enchanted Evening. — Ventura Star-Free Press

…beautiful voice of Gregory Stapp, who sang impeccably… — Rome Psicoanalisi Contro

Bass Gregory Stapp had to make his first entrance, in the tuba mirum, over the rich, sonorous accompaniment of the trombone. It proved to be more duet than competition, however, for Stapp’s voice is amply endowed with a power and resonance that rivals the regal trombone’s. — Sacramento Union

Gregory Stapp, bass, was excellent as the old seer Tiresias. — San Francisco Chronicle 

Gregory Stapp is a singer you really have to look up to. Literally. And when he sings, everyone seems smaller. The voice rolls out like thunder. — San Francisco Opera Companion

The solo voices were spectacular…and Stapp’s Confutatis were gorgeous,…The many ensembles--trios, duets, and the full quartet--demonstrated a beautiful blend. — Springfield State Journal-Register

The bass Gregory Stapp also brought a strong voice to the quartet and had two notable solos in the Dies irae…The talent of the four together was a treat to see. — Bloomington Pantagraph

The solo quartet sang well… Gregory Stapp, impressive in the grand bass solo. [Christ lag in Todesbanden] — San Francisco Chronicle

A thorough command of all the demanding elements of being upon the operatic stage was shown to a capacity audience by Gregory Stapp, bass…excelled in coordinating all the contrasts of his music with believable stage movement, gestures and facial expressions…attractive and talented…splendid encores… — Vallejo Independent Press

Stapp’s booming bass rounded out the satisfying presentation. [Messiah] — Ventura Star-Free Press

Gregory Stapp sang exceedingly well. [Messiah] — Oxnard Press-Courier 

Gregory Stapp as the Second armored man had much more presence, both vocal and physical, than Burchuladze [as Sarastro]. — ConcertoNet.com

Bass Gregory Stapp added perhaps the most sepulchral timbre to the ensemble as the mysterious Monk. — San Francisco Classical Voice

Gregory Stapp is tall, strikingly handsome, with a rich and resonant bass voice and a good command of the stage. — Opera Guide

Stapp’s pointed dark-hued basso was heard to best advantage in the invocations of Verdi’s Padre Guardiano. — Los Angeles Times

Stapp riveted me with his singing of Il lacerato spirito. The aria ends on a low F-sharp and Stapp boomed it out, big and round and satisfying. — Denver Westword

Stapp chose several real tests for the bass voice and passed all of them. He sustained the long lines of In diesen heil’gen Hallen and negotiated the wide range of Si la rigueur with no apparent difficulty. Ave, Signor from Mefistofele gave the audience a good indication of what a commanding figure he would cut in the title role of that opera. — Hagerstown Morning Herald

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Gregory Stapp

Bass